Shakespeare Sunday | 200817

Background image of moutains, with overlay text reading "I drink to the general joy of the whole table" from The Scottish Play

“I drink to the general joy of the whole table” Macb The Scottish Play, Shakespeare.

By far my favourite play from the Bard. I read it, saw all film/tv variations of the time, and anything related to it during my time at school preparing for GCSEs. This wasn’t a voluntary situation, my whole class were put through vigorous The Scottish Play study as my English teacher had broken her arm. It was a simple case of wheeling in the tv set and putting on the tape rather than having an actual English literature teacher in for the lesson.

Anyway, I like this particular quote as it’s when Banquo’s ghost starts making his appearances- and Macbeth himself starts going steadily crazy. The irony of the declaration, to reassure himself and others of good health- when he can clearly see his dead best before him.

If you’re unfamiliar with The Scottish Play Macbeth and Banquo, in the first scene come across three witches that predict that Macbeth will be the King of Scotland, but it will be Banquo’s children who will reign after they both die. In an attempt to prevent this Macbeth arranges someone to knobble both Banquo and his son, this leads to Duncan coming forth to challenge Macbeth’s challenge to the crown after Lady Macbeth kills off the King.

Fudgen love The Scottish Play.

In terms of applying it to the modern day, I can only think about people’s double meaning on social media- I wrote about it on Social Media Sanity. At the same time, it could be easily lent to the childish acts of the Toddler in Cheif. The silly rhetoric between himself and the other child at the top in Pyongyang; I do wonder if he realises that people don’t really talk like that outside of the movies?

Image Credit: By Luis Ascenso Photography from Lisbon, Portugal – Blue is coming in Quiraing, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=39805273

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